Amid Super Bowl win, Ravens still competing for attention in new sports hotbed

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This story is originally published on Feb. 3, 2013 by Connect2Mason, the student-run news website for George Mason University. 

On first mention by most Americans, Washington D.C. is labeled as the political center of the free world while Baltimore is heralded as the setting of the HBO TV drama, The Wire along with being the unofficial home of crab cakes and football.

Over the past year, the area known as the DMV has become a hotbed for competitive and successful sports teams following years of futility and just downright mediocrity.  

College football and partying aren’t always hand-in-hand

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This story was originally published on Oct. 12, 2012 by Connect2Mason, the student-run news website for George Mason University. 

Partying and college are synonymous with each other. Popular culture tells us that the purpose of college is to have as much fun as possible while managing to earn a degree before facing the everyday struggles of life in the “real world.” Throw in a successful football team and you have a cornucopia of emotions, rolled into one. But when does this mixture of partying, football and college become detrimental to a student’s academics?

According to a recent study by the American Economic Journal, researchers found that students at schools with a thriving varsity football program study less and party more than students at institutions without a successful football team.

Robert Griffin III has mine and the District’s approval

This story was originally published on Oct. 20, 2012 by Connect2Mason, the student-run news website for George Mason University.

Washington, D.C. has been through a whirlwind of emotion over the past week. Postseason baseball returned to the nation’s capital for the first time since the FDR administration. The Nationals won an exhilarating Game 4 in walk-off fashion on Jayson Werth’s home run, all before a heart-breaking collapse in the ninth inning of Game 5, roughly 24 hours later, putting an end to the team’s promising season.

But amid the disappointment, sprung a beacon of hope for a sports city that even longtime Washington Post sports columnist Michael Wilbon called "terrible".

Patriots end season in Cleveland with loss to top-ranked Ohio State

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This story was originally published on March 28, 2011 by Broadside, the former student-run newspaper for George Mason University.

The men’s basketball season came to a close last Sunday night in Cleveland, Ohio after a 98-66 loss to Ohio State University in the third round of the NCAA tournament. The loss brought an end to an unexpectedly successful season for the Patriots. Coming off a brutal loss to Fairfield in the first round of the CollegeInsider.net postseason tournament last March, the Patriots looked far from winning a CAA regular season champion and NCAA tournament bid this season.

Report: GMU men’s basketball had shortfall of $2.3 million in ‘11-‘12

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This story was originally published on Sept. 9, 2013 by Fourth Estate, the student-run news website for George Mason University.

On Monday morning, the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission released a report detailing non-academic services and costs of higher education public institutions in Virginia.

The report addressed a number of issues facing the current landscape of college athletics, specifically in the state, including funding, student fees and revenue generation of basketball and football programs. 

Mason announces move to Atlantic 10 for all sports

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This story was originally published on March 25, 2013 by Connect2Mason, the student-run news website for George Mason University.

George Mason University announced in a press conference today their decision to move to the Atlantic 10 conference for all sports, effective on July 1. 

According to a Mason Athletics press release, the university’s decision to move to the A-10 will “help further showcase the exemplary contributions of Mason’s faculty and students and all that the university has to offer.”

Spuhler Field, Field House renovations set in motion to break ground in late spring

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This story was originally published on Feb. 19, 2013 by Connect2Mason, the student-run news website for George Mason University.

The West Campus Connector is not the only construction that will be taking place on George Mason University’s West Campus in the coming months. According to a Fairfax Campus advisory group meeting on Dec. 12, 2012, facility projects to renovate Spuhler Field, the baseball stadium, and the Field House, the intercollegiate sports complex, are set to begin in late spring.

Hewitt hires world-class coaching staff

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This story was originally published on July 1, 2011 by Connect2Mason, the student-run news website for George Mason University.

After Paul Hewitt was formally announced as the new George Mason head coach at the Mason Inn on May 2, his first order of business was to assemble a staff of assistant coaches that fit in well with his system and would be good teachers and mentors for his team.

And he was able to do just that with the three coaches that he brought in: Chris Kreider, Roland Houston and Mike Wells.

City of Richmond bids farewell to 24-year March tradition in CAA tournament

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This story was originally published on March 19, 2013 by Connect2Mason, the student-run news website for George Mason University.

The city of Richmond has been the heart of the Colonial Athletic Association men’s basketball tournament for 24 years. However, next year when March rolls around, the Richmond Coliseum, that hosts the event, will be missing its weekend attraction as the tournament moves north to Baltimore.

Though its reign as the tournament’s location comes to an end, Richmond and the Richmond Coliseum was the setting for many memories in its over two decades as the CAA host city.

An Evening with Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band at Nationals Park

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The following story was originally published on Sept. 18, 2012 by Connect2Mason, the student-run news website for George Mason University.

Witnessing Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band live is a religious experience. Like a preacher spreading the good news from the pulpit, Springsteen commands your attention from beginning to end with a passion and presence unaccustomed for a 62-year old rocker. With gospel and rock melodies coupled with the powerful lyrics of his songs, Springsteen intends to enlighten and console even the most down-trodden follower. The congregation, young and old, feed off this empowering energy, with arms held high and voices to the heavens.

Friday night at Nationals Park in Washington, D.C. was no different.